SOAR

splunk

Streamlining Vulnerability Management with Splunk Phantom

Vulnerabilities are weaknesses in the security infrastructure that bad actors can exploit to gain unauthorized access to a private network. It is nearly impossible for security analysts to patch 100% of the vulnerabilities identified on any given day, but a vulnerability management plan can ensure that the highest risk vulnerabilities (those that are most likely to cause a data breach), will be addressed immediately.

logsign

What is SOAR?

If an individual wants to acquire information about cyber security, or cyber security tools in general, coming across SOAR is inevitable. Since the SOAR abbreviation is all over the place, the importance of it is also easy to recognize. What makes SOAR crucial for cyber security then? In order to answer this question, the full name of the tool should be addressed. SOAR stands for** Security Orchestration Automation and Response**.

siemplify

10 Must-Ask Questions When Choosing a SOAR Solution in 2021

The adoption of security orchestration, automation and response (SOAR) platforms has grown significantly in recent years. Countless end-user and service provider security operations teams are leveraging SOAR to address the most common security operations challenges – too many disparate technologies, alert overload, limited staff and manual processes.

Splunk SOAR Playbooks: Azure New User Census

Hafnium is the latest cyberattack that utilizes a number of post-exploitation tools after gaining access to Exchange servers through a zero-day exploit. One of their persistence methods was creating new user accounts in the domain, giving them the ability to log back into the network using normal authentication rather than use a web shell or continue to re-exploit the vulnerability (which has since been patched). Learn how you can use Splunk Phantom to automate account monitoring to ensure that threat actors are not exploiting vulnerabilities to access sensitive information through authenticated accounts.
splunk

Taking Automation Beyond the SOC With Advanced Network Access Control

Security orchestration, automation and response (SOAR) tools are most commonly known for automating manual security operations processes in order to expedite security investigations or cyber response. For instance, Splunk’s SOAR technology, Splunk Phantom, is most commonly used to automate alert triage, phishing investigation and response, threat hunting and vulnerability management.

splunk

Splunk SOAR Playbooks: Conducting an Azure New User Census

In January and February of 2021, the threat actor called Hafnium used a number of post-exploitation tools after gaining access to Exchange servers through a zero-day exploit. One of their persistence methods was creating new user accounts in the domain, giving them the ability to log back into the network using normal authentication rather than use a web shell or continue to re-exploit the vulnerability (which has since been patched).

How SOAR Helps Service Providers Meet MSSP Challenges: A Conversation With Forrester Research

Joseph Blankenship and Chase Cunningham of Forrester Research joined Siemplify for a four-part video series. In the fourth and final part, the pair discusses the role of SOAR for service providers, how they can evaluate their own success, and what selection criteria should look like for end-users shopping for an MSSP – especially in the era of more demanding customers and the death of the “black-box” MSSP model.
splunk

Automated Clean-up of HAFNIUM Shells and Processes with Splunk Phantom

If you haven’t been living under a rock for the past few weeks, you've probably come across the recent Microsoft Exchange Server vulnerabilities and its associated exploits.Stop!!! The first thing you should do is to go and patch any Exchange servers you may be running, then you can come back and finish reading this blog. Microsoft's blog provides links to various tools to help in this regard.

anlyz

Reducing Response Times with SOAR-Integrated Threat Intelligence

Security teams tend to devote a considerable amount of time to investigating warnings that may or may not be "actual" attacks. A false positive occurs when a natural or non-threatening behavior is mistakenly interpreted as malicious. Thousands of warnings may need to be investigated as a result of this. If your security analysts are actively reviewing false warnings, they can spend a lot of time evaluating false alerts before they can start evaluating legitimate threats.